A Split-Level House Set At The Edge Of A Golf Course

Kevin Brown

A Split-Level House Set At The Edge Of A Golf Course

Golf Course House bathroom and laundry – The main bathroom also functions as a laundry area, with a separate section designed for this purpose.

Golf Course House mid century bed – The owners achieved a mid-century modern vibe in the interior decor through artwork.

Golf Course House guest room – The study can also function as a guest room or an additional entertainment area when needed.

Golf Course House exposed ceiling beams – The kitchen island divides the cooking area from the dining and living space.

Golf Course House small kitchen window – The kitchen is open but small, with a user-friendly and welcoming design.

Golf Course House fireplace focal point – The exposed beams and fireplace create warmth and comfort in the living area.

Golf Course House living room divided by fireplace – The interior is small, so spaces are multifunctional, serving as a living room, kitchen, and dining area.

Golf Course House Landscape view – Large windows give the living room views of the sand dunes.

Golf Course House grass edges – The internal courtyard is both open and intimate, clearly delineated at the site’s edges.

Golf Course House flagstone patio – The courtyard serves as a flat and simple al-fresco lounge area.

Golf Course House internal courtyard – A central courtyard exists between the house volumes.

Golf Course House floating small porch – Different floor levels delineate zones and create clear distinctions.

Golf Course House wood clad exterior – Solid walls offer privacy and create a cozy and comfortable atmosphere.

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Golf Course House with black window panelling and matching roofs – Interior spaces open towards the golf course and sand dunes.

Golf Course House with a slightly slanted roof – Cantilevered concrete floors create the illusion of floating volumes.

Golf Course House with a small vegetable garden at the back – Various zones and functions are delineated throughout the interior and exterior spaces, like this garden.

Golf Course House with a split level structure – This is a split-level home with separate zones that are separate structures with their own character.

Golf Course House with wood clad exterior walls and a black garage – The house is clad in ash wood on the outside and has a garage with a black shell which contrasts with the living spaces.

A Split-Level House Set At The Edge Of A Golf Course
A Split-Level House Set At The Edge Of A Golf Course
A Split-Level House Set At The Edge Of A Golf Course
A Split-Level House Set At The Edge Of A Golf Course
A Split-Level House Set At The Edge Of A Golf Course
A Split-Level House Set At The Edge Of A Golf Course
A Split-Level House Set At The Edge Of A Golf Course
A Split-Level House Set At The Edge Of A Golf Course
A Split-Level House Set At The Edge Of A Golf Course
A Split-Level House Set At The Edge Of A Golf Course
A Split-Level House Set At The Edge Of A Golf Course
A Split-Level House Set At The Edge Of A Golf Course
A Split-Level House Set At The Edge Of A Golf Course
A Split-Level House Set At The Edge Of A Golf Course
A Split-Level House Set At The Edge Of A Golf Course
A Split-Level House Set At The Edge Of A Golf Course
A Split-Level House Set At The Edge Of A Golf Course
A Split-Level House Set At The Edge Of A Golf Course
A Split-Level House Set At The Edge Of A Golf Course

This residence is situated on the 13th Beach Golf Course Estate in Connerwarre, Australia. It’s a split-level home covering a total area of 309.5 square meters. Designed and constructed by Bespoke Architects in 2017, there are several notable features about this project. Firstly, the views are stunning.

The house faces the sand dunes to the south, has a courtyard to the east with views of a tree reserve, and opens up to the golf course. The northern wing of the house faces the street.

A Split-Level House Set At The Edge Of A Golf Course
A Split-Level House Set At The Edge Of A Golf Course

The house design was partially guided by local restrictions, which mandated setbacks on all sides and a limited selection of exterior materials. To comply with these guidelines and satisfy their clients’ desire for a mid-century modern home, the architects employed a reverse skin technique. This involved using concrete for the interior walls and ash wood for the exterior walls.

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