Choosing the best siding for houses is subjective. Changing or installing new siding is done with the goal of improving your home’s curb appeal.

Kevin Brown

Siding for Houses: Choosing the Best for Your Home

Choosing the best siding for houses is subjective. Changing or installing new siding is done with the goal of improving your home’s curb appeal.

Choosing the best siding for houses is subjective. Changing or installing new siding is done with the goal of improving your home's curb appeal.

With all the types of siding available, a siding project can be daunting. Before you decide, you need the right information.

Types Of Siding

There is a wide array of siding available today. The good news is that with most house siding, the only maintenance required later is keeping it clean. Steel, metal, and fiber cement siding offer unique challenges.

In recent years, new siding has emerged that is highly durable and offers longer lifespans.

Choosing the best siding for houses is subjective. Changing or installing new siding is done with the goal of improving your home's curb appeal.

One type of metal siding isn’t superior to others as it depends on your needs. The optimal siding for people living in cold climates might not be the same for those in warmer climates.

While there isn’t a definitive best siding option, there are choices that work well for your home. Let’s discuss the various types of siding and their respective categories, including pricing, reasons for selection, and cost-effectiveness.

Natural Wood Siding

Choosing the best siding for houses is subjective. Changing or installing new siding is done with the goal of improving your home's curb appeal.

If you want a real wood look, there are many types of wood siding to choose from, including board and batten or log. The question is, what type of wood is the longest lasting? This is similar to picking hardwood flooring. Engineered wood siding is popular because it can last 50 years or longer.

Older homes typically don’t have siding, so if your home was built before 1960, it’s time to explore other options. Cedar shake shingles are a popular and cost-effective wood siding option. They are also environmentally friendly and long lasting compared to other options.

Cedar shake shingles are made from sustainable and durable softwood, and they provide excellent sound insulation and energy efficiency.

Redwood Shingles

Cost: $8-$20 per square foot

Redwood siding has a cozy, lodge-like appearance with its red tones. However, its appeal goes beyond just its color. This hardwood is durable, resistant to weather and insects, and requires low maintenance.

Pine Wood Siding

Cost: $1-$5 per square foot

Pine wood siding is one of the cheapest options available, costing a dollar or less per square foot. It is also recyclable and offers durability, weather resistance, and great curb appeal.

Engineered Wood Siding

Choosing the best siding for houses is subjective. Changing or installing new siding is done with the goal of improving your home's curb appeal.

Engineered wood siding is the best choice for a natural and rustic exterior. It adds great curb appeal to your home, surpassing the limitations of wood shingles. Many people fall in love with this unique option soon after installation, as it serves as a nice alternative to brick veneer or natural stone.

Stone veneer siding is another option that offers a combination of rustic and modern looks, depending on the wood tones and its cut. It is available in natural and uncut shapes, making installation easier. This type of siding is durable and fade resistant, which is highly appreciated by homeowners.

The cost of natural stone veneer ranges from $28 to $50 per square foot.

Natural stone veneer house siding is an expensive option. It uses real rocks and stones, either uncut or cut to look natural. You can use it as your wall or fireplace.

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Despite the high price, many homeowners choose it for its durability and curb appeal.

Stone cladding is a cheaper alternative to stone siding. It is still real stone, but it’s cut thin enough to go on top of existing siding or plywood. It works in panels or like vinyl siding.

Natural stone block siding costs $10-$15 per square foot.

Stone blocks, an alternative to uncut stones, are used for constructing walls and structures. They are standalone structures and are typically cheaper than natural stones. Natural stones, on the other hand, are usually used in combination with other materials. However, if you are looking for a high-end option, stone is ideal for impressing others.

Another option to consider is cement siding.

Choosing the best siding for houses is subjective. Changing or installing new siding is done with the goal of improving your home's curb appeal.

Cement siding, a popular choice, can be strengthened by incorporating cement into the siding. To understand the difference between cement and concrete, consider the following:

Concrete:

– Cost: $10 to $60 per square foot

– While not suitable for siding, concrete walls are durable and offer excellent resistance. They are also energy efficient, making them a valuable option for home exteriors.

Fiber Cement Siding:

– Cost: $1 to $20 per sq ft

Faux Stone Veneer

Cost: $10 to $15 per square foot

Faux stone veneer is not made of cement, despite its stone-like appearance. It is a great option for those who desire a stone look but cannot afford real stone. While not inexpensive, it is significantly more affordable than genuine stone and is often indistinguishable from the real thing.

Stucco

Cost: $2 to 49 per square foot

If you desire a vintage and high-end look, stucco is the perfect choice. Although acrylic stucco is more luxurious than cement stucco, it is also five times more expensive. Therefore, most people opt for cement stucco for general housing purposes.

Cement stucco is ideal for horizontal lap siding and is a popular choice for siding replacement as well.

When Is Cement the Best Choice for a House?

Cement is ideal for a house when you want something durable and affordable. Made with Portland cement, it’s the cheapest option that will last a lifetime. Metal Siding

Choosing the best siding for houses is subjective. Changing or installing new siding is done with the goal of improving your home's curb appeal.

Metal siding is not commonly used in residential structures but is often used for barns, metal roofs, and outdoor buildings. However, it has recently gained popularity for use in houses due to its numerous advantages.

Copper siding costs between $7 and $9 per square foot. Copper is a distinct metal with a warm hue and is highly durable and resistant to corrosion. The only change it undergoes over time is fading.

Steel siding costs between $4 and $5 per square foot. It is a cost-effective option as it is made up of various metals. While there are cheaper alternatives available, they are typically used for outbuildings rather than residential homes that require enhanced safety.

Finally, aluminum siding…

Cost: $3 to $4.50 per square foot Aluminum siding is slightly cheaper than steel. It is easier to install, as it is flexible and can be placed on curves. It is also lightweight compared to steel.

Both options are good and come down to preference and availability.

When Is Metal The Best For A House?

Metal siding is ideal for a modern-looking house. It can have a rustic feel, but only if you make it look barn-like.

Brick Siding

Choosing the best siding for houses is subjective. Changing or installing new siding is done with the goal of improving your home's curb appeal.

Brick houses are common as brick is considered one of the strongest building materials.

Solid Brick Siding:

Cost: $14 to $28 per square foot.

Solid brick siding is 4in thick and uses real bricks to cover and insulate your home. It is more expensive compared to other siding options.

Thin Brick Siding:

Cost: $10 to $20 per square foot.

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Thin brick, or brick veneer, is made out of real brick. It is cheaper and uses fewer materials compared to solid brick. However, it is not as strong or durable.

Brick is great for achieving a modern and homey look. It is a popular choice, especially in stormy regions, due to its exceptional durability compared to other siding options.

Choosing the best siding for houses is subjective. Changing or installing new siding is done with the goal of improving your home's curb appeal.

Vinyl siding is the cheapest option available today. It can replicate any look you want, but at a much lower cost than the real material it imitates.

Clapboard siding is a cost-effective choice, priced at less than $2 per square foot. It offers a classic look and can save you a significant amount of money compared to other options.

Log siding, which resembles wood, varies in cost. Sometimes you can find it at the same price as clapboard siding, but other times it may be more expensive than real wood. Therefore, it can be a bit of a gamble.

Lastly, board and batten siding

Cost: Less than $2 per square foot

Board and batten is sold for the same amount as regular vinyl. The siding comes in panels and is easy to install. It isn’t high maintenance and offers something different than other types of siding.

Shake Siding

Cost: $3 to $7 per square foot

Shake siding is similar to vinyl shingles. It costs a little more but can be quite a bit cheaper if you install it yourself. It takes time to install shake whereas other vinyl sidings can go up in mere hours or minutes.

Vinyl Siding Ideal?

Vinyl siding is a good option if you want something versatile yet cheap. If you want something very specific yet can’t afford it, then you should probably get vinyl as it will get the look you want at a fraction of the price.

House Siding Colors And Textures

Deep Red is a classic Italian horror film directed by Dario Argento and released in 1975. It is widely considered one of the best giallo films ever made. The plot revolves around a musician named Marcus who becomes entangled in a series of murders after witnessing the killing of a psychic.

As the body count rises, Marcus teams up with a journalist named Gianna to uncover the identity of the killer. The film is known for its stylish visuals, intense violence, and haunting score, composed by Goblin. Deep Red is an important film in the giallo genre and has influenced countless filmmakers since its release.

Choosing the best siding for houses is subjective. Changing or installing new siding is done with the goal of improving your home's curb appeal.

Deep red is an excellent choice. Avoid barn red for a country look. Stick to darker shades like burgundy and maroon.

Choosing the best siding for houses is subjective. Changing or installing new siding is done with the goal of improving your home's curb appeal.

Beige is popular with board and batten siding as it offers a natural appearance. It is a safe choice and great for selling your house. A brighter color may be off-putting, but no one will say “no” to beige.

Choosing the best siding for houses is subjective. Changing or installing new siding is done with the goal of improving your home's curb appeal.

White is the most popular color for vinyl siding. Any shade of white can be used without regret. Choose creamy vanilla for a soft look or crisp white for something clean and sophisticated.

You want to achieve the same aesthetic that’s common in your neighborhood, and white is usually the best choice.

Choosing the best siding for houses is subjective. Changing or installing new siding is done with the goal of improving your home's curb appeal.

Yellow is a good choice for board and batten or lap siding. It gives a house a cottage feel. Avoid dark or bright yellow; choose a softer shade.

Yellow is a popular house color that is not dull or overwhelming.

Choosing the best siding for houses is subjective. Changing or installing new siding is done with the goal of improving your home's curb appeal.

When it comes to green siding, any mute green will work. Green is a popular vinyl siding color and can be achieved with metal siding as well. It’s important to choose the right shade, with a medium, more neutral green being the safest option.

Sage is an excellent choice as it never goes out of style. While darker shades are available, it’s advised to consult your HOA guidelines before making a decision, as some shades may be prohibited.

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Barely Blue is another color worth considering for your siding.

Choosing the best siding for houses is subjective. Changing or installing new siding is done with the goal of improving your home's curb appeal.

Almost any blue can work for a house exterior, but the best blue siding option is a barely-there blue. It is very light and almost appears white. If you want just a hint of color, this is the best choice.

Choosing the best siding for houses is subjective. Changing or installing new siding is done with the goal of improving your home's curb appeal.

Gray is a great choice for neutral environments. It is often the safest option for a house color. Gray offers something in-between white beige and white.

It is a cool color but also evokes stone, adding value to a house.

Choosing the best siding for houses is subjective. Changing or installing new siding is done with the goal of improving your home's curb appeal.

You can use teal, aquamarine, or another ocean blue green for an automatic beach house. Beach houses are popular right now so any beach house color will work well in personal homes and those for sale.

Choosing the best siding for houses is subjective. Changing or installing new siding is done with the goal of improving your home's curb appeal.

Most colors work on house exteriors, but purple is risky. However, you can use peach freely as it is a safe color, especially if you want a pink house.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

Which Type Of Siding Requires No Maintenance?

Vinyl siding is a low-maintenance option that frees you from the need to scrape, paint, or otherwise maintain your home’s exterior. It was introduced in the 1950s as an alternative to wood.

What Is The Difference Between Hard Plank And Hardie Board?

Vinyl siding is the cheapest option for siding, both in terms of material and installation costs. It can be quickly installed and even placed directly over existing materials. It requires low maintenance and is an excellent choice for those on a limited budget.

Clapboard siding is a type of wood siding that is installed horizontally in an overlapping pattern from the bottom of the wall upwards. It is a popular choice among homeowners.

When it comes to energy efficiency, vinyl siding outperforms wood siding. While wood is a good insulator, it is prone to changing with temperature fluctuations, making it impossible to achieve a completely airtight seal.

Types Of Siding Conclusion

After learning about the various types of siding available, you can make an informed decision. Whether you prefer real wood siding or a stone veneer, you will know what to expect before installation.

Most siding options last 50 years and come with a warranty. When purchasing wood siding, ensure it is made with fire-resistant material to protect your home from moisture damage. Depending on your location, certain types of siding may present challenges, requiring you to consider alternative styles.

Siding comes in various weather-resistant colors. The best siding options are durable and long-lasting, providing superior protection for your home. When applied, siding effectively preserves your home.

Before purchasing siding, consider that it is an eco-friendly solution that may require occasional maintenance but is ultimately worth it in the long run. Each type of siding offers a distinct appearance, so take your time to choose the best option for your home.

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