What is a Jerkinhead Roof?

Kevin Brown

What is a Jerkinhead Roof?

A jerkinhead roof is a variation of a gable roof with clipped overhangs on each end.

Jerkinhead roofs are common in Tudor-style, craftsman, Queen Anne, and stick-style homes. Their unique shape provides both structural stability and visual appeal.

If you’re considering a jerkinhead roof for your home, here are some examples, advantages, and disadvantages to keep in mind.

What is a Jerkinhead Roof Design?

<strong>A jerkinhead roof is a variation of a gable roof with clipped overhangs on each end.</strong>

A jerkinhead roof combines two styles – a gable and a hipped roof. Gable roofs have two slopes, resembling a triangle, while hipped roofs have four sloping sides that meet at a ridge or peak.

A jerkinhead roof has the appearance of a gable roof on the sides, with two slopes that meet at a ridge. The front and back have a hipped section, which is shorter than the sides, resulting in an asymmetrical roof.

Pros and Cons of a Jerkinhead Roof:

The jerkinhead roof offers a traditional look with its own set of advantages and disadvantages.

Pros:

– Increased stability: The hipped ends of a jerkinhead roof provide more strength and resistance against high winds compared to a standard gable roof.

An Efficient Jerkinhead Roof: The Pros and Cons

Jerkinhead roofs offer several advantages over traditional hip roofs. Here are some key points to consider:

  • Spaciousness – Unlike a hip roof, a jerkinhead roof does not eat into the top floor space. With this design, the front and back have hipped sides, leaving ample room for a large top floor or attic.
  • Leak-resistant – Jerkinhead roofs are less prone to leaks compared to hip roofs. The clipped hipped sections have shorter seams and are more resistant to leaks.
  • Aesthetics – Opting for a jerkinhead roof will give your home a traditional or historic appearance.
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On the other hand, there are a few drawbacks to consider:

  • Higher cost – Building a jerkinhead roof typically requires additional labor and materials, making them more expensive than standard gable roofs.
  • Complex repairs – Due to their design, jerkinhead roofs can be more challenging to access and repair when compared to other roof types.

Jerkinhead Roof vs. Hip Roof: Which is Better?

When it comes to choosing between a jerkinhead roof and a hip roof, it’s important to understand the differences and their respective advantages. Both roofs are popular choices among homeowners due to their unique characteristics and aesthetic appeal.

A jerkinhead roof, also known as a clipped gable roof, is a combination of a gable roof and a hip roof. It features sloping sides and a flat top, which creates a distinctive look. This type of roof is known for its ability to withstand strong winds and its overall stability.

Additionally, the sloping sides of a jerkinhead roof provide extra space, which can be used for attic storage or to create a unique architectural design.

On the other hand, a hip roof is a more common and traditional style of roof. It consists of slopes on all four sides, which meet at a central ridge. This type of roof is known for its durability and ability to withstand extreme weather conditions. The inclined sides of a hip roof provide excellent water drainage, reducing the risk of leaks and water damage.

Hip roofs are also more aerodynamic, which can help to reduce energy costs by improving air circulation and ventilation.

When someone is deciding between a jerkinhead roof and a hip roof, it’s important to consider their specific needs and preferences. If you’re looking for a roof that maximizes space and allows for unique design options, a jerkinhead roof may be the better choice. Conversely, if you prioritize durability and energy efficiency, a hip roof may be more suitable.

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By following these guidelines and considerations, homeowners can make an informed decision and choose the right roof for their needs. Both the jerkinhead roof and the hip roof offer unique benefits and visual appeal. Ultimately, the decision between the two comes down to personal preference and priorities.

<strong>A jerkinhead roof is a variation of a gable roof with clipped overhangs on each end.</strong>

A hip roof has four self-bracing sloping sides, making it superior at withstanding high winds. However, the many seams in hip roofs can create space for leaks.

A jerkinhead roof is a gable roof design with two sloping sides. Only the ends of the roof have hipped sections, which are clipped short. While the hip additions help the roof withstand wind, they are not as effective as a traditional hip roof.

Both roofs have merits, and the choice often comes down to aesthetics. Jerkinhead roofs are the best for a historical, traditional look. Standard hip roofs can work for all home styles but are especially popular for tropical homes.

Here are some examples of jerkinhead roofs.

<strong>A jerkinhead roof is a variation of a gable roof with clipped overhangs on each end.</strong>

The jerkinhead roof of this craftsman bungalow attracts attention and provides shade to the upper windows. Wood Home with a Jerkinhead Roof.

<strong>A jerkinhead roof is a variation of a gable roof with clipped overhangs on each end.</strong>

A jerkinhead or clipped gable roof tops this wood home in Denver, Colorado, giving it a traditional feel that complements its rustic wood siding.

<strong>A jerkinhead roof is a variation of a gable roof with clipped overhangs on each end.</strong>

Jerkinhead roofs are common in English-style homes. The architects of this home added clipped gable roofs for a traditional look. Jerkinhead roofs are known for their unique silhouette, with the gable ends partially cut off and sloping down. These roofs are a popular choice for homeowners seeking a combination of aesthetic appeal and practicality. They provide the benefits of a pitched roof, such as increased attic space and improved water drainage, while also adding a touch of architectural interest.

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Jerkinhead roofs are also referred to as hipped gable roofs or half-hipped roofs. They are a versatile design option that can complement various architectural styles.

<strong>A jerkinhead roof is a variation of a gable roof with clipped overhangs on each end.</strong>

The homeowners chose a shingle jerkinhead roof for this home, giving it a historic look. The home features an intricate roof design, combining many styles.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

What is another name for a jerkinhead roof?

Jerkinhead roofs are also called clipped gable and snub gable roofs.

Is the jerkinhead roof a kind of gable?

A jerkinhead roof is a gable roof with two hipped sections at the end that are clipped or cut short.

Can you put a jerkinhead roof on a dormer?

You can put a jerkinhead roof over dormers – doing so will provide shade for the dormer windows.

What material can you put on a jerkinhead roof?

You can use any material on a jerkinhead roof, but shingles, tiles, and slate are most common.

A Jerkinhead is a suitable option for Tudor, craftsman, Queen Anne, and stick style homes. They are more expensive and complicated to maintain than other roofs. However, if you want a historical look for your house, they are one of the best options to consider.

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