Industrial interior design showcases the raw aesthetics of old factories. It offers a modern twist and blends seamlessly with other styles. This style is characterized by exposed brick, ductwork, metal, and concrete. Let’s delve into the history of industrial interior design and explore how to achieve this unique look.

Kevin Brown

Industrial interior design showcases the raw aesthetics of old factories. It offers a modern twist and blends seamlessly with other styles. This style is characterized by exposed brick, ductwork, metal, and concrete.

Let’s delve into the history of industrial interior design and explore how to achieve this unique look.

Industrial interior design showcases the raw aesthetics of old factories. It offers a modern twist and blends seamlessly with other styles. This style is characterized by exposed brick, ductwork, metal, and concrete. Let's delve into the history of industrial interior design and explore how to achieve this unique look.

Industrial interior design emerged in the 1970s. However, it gained significant traction in the early 2000s when cities like New York, grappling with housing shortages, repurposed vacant 19th-century factories as residential spaces.

These factories were converted into multiple units, retaining their original features such as exposed brick walls, concrete floors, and exposed ductwork. Loft spaces were added to create additional bedrooms.

The prevalence of these industrial apartments in urban areas quickly popularized the style throughout the United States.

Industrial interior design is characterized by a modern and minimalist aesthetic that avoids feeling cold. It shares similarities with Scandinavian design, emphasizing raw materials and minimal decoration. To incorporate industrial style into your home, follow these steps.

Industrial designs often feature unfinished ceilings, revealing the details of the HVAC and plumbing systems.

If you prefer a more concealed look, consider a bathroom sink with exposed piping.

Opt for an exposed brick wall to achieve a raw and warm aesthetic. This was a common feature in factories from the late 19th and early 20th centuries. If you don’t live in a brick home, you can still incorporate a brick veneer accent wall.

Mixing metal and reclaimed wood adds texture and complements each other. Reclaimed wood brings warmth, while metal provides contrast. Consider incorporating metal and wood dining tables, console tables, and chairs.

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Use Edison light bulbs for a vintage touch.

An easy way to achieve an industrial look is by using exposed Edison bulbs in light fixtures. You can also opt for caged light fixtures or those with large metal domes.

Focus on natural light and open spaces. Industrial interiors have large windows that allow abundant natural light. The spaces are open, often featuring a bedroom loft.

Incorporate concrete. Concrete floors and countertops are synonymous with industrial style. If you’re not ready for a bare concrete floor, consider using rustic hardwood.

Stick to a neutral color palette. The industrial interior design color palette consists of shades of gray, black, white, brown, and rust. These colors are derived from raw materials like concrete, brick, wood, and metal.

Decorate with industrial furniture and decor. Choose pieces that reflect the industrial aesthetic, such as reclaimed wood, metal, and leather furniture. Accessorize with vintage industrial-inspired items to complete the look.

Mixing Industrial with Other Styles

Industrial interior design complements various styles such as rustic, farmhouse, modern, mid-century modern, and Scandinavian. To incorporate an industrial vibe into your room, consider elements such as caged light fixtures, exposed piping, or metal chairs.

Industrial design also has different subsets, including:

  • Industrial farmhouse design – An amalgamation of rustic farmhouse aesthetics with metal finishes.
  • Modern industrial design – The use of raw materials like concrete, brick, wood, and metal, combined with streamlined furniture and pops of color.
  • Luxury industrial design – A modern approach featuring sleek concrete floors and high-end furniture and accessories.

Examples of Industrial Interior Design:

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These pictures showcase industrial interiors that can inspire your next home makeover.

Industrial Kitchen Design:

Next, let’s explore industrial kitchen design.

Industrial interior design showcases the raw aesthetics of old factories. It offers a modern twist and blends seamlessly with other styles. This style is characterized by exposed brick, ductwork, metal, and concrete. Let's delve into the history of industrial interior design and explore how to achieve this unique look.

This industrial-style kitchen incorporates a variety of raw materials such as wood, metal, and concrete. The exposed wood ceilings add warmth to the cool color palette.

Industrial interior design showcases the raw aesthetics of old factories. It offers a modern twist and blends seamlessly with other styles. This style is characterized by exposed brick, ductwork, metal, and concrete. Let's delve into the history of industrial interior design and explore how to achieve this unique look.

This modern industrial living room features concrete walls and floor, adding a raw look. The pops of orange and contemporary furniture make it even more stylish.

Industrial Loft Bedroom

Industrial interior design showcases the raw aesthetics of old factories. It offers a modern twist and blends seamlessly with other styles. This style is characterized by exposed brick, ductwork, metal, and concrete. Let's delve into the history of industrial interior design and explore how to achieve this unique look.

In this example, exposed ductwork guides to a cool-toned modern industrial loft bedroom. However, the area behind the bed showcases mirrors, not a real window.

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